Cultural identity essay

Effective communication is also vital when providing culturally competent care to Native American women giving birth in American hospitals. In order for Native Americans to be involved wholly in their own medical care, health services ought to be available in Native American languages. According to Campinha-Bacote (2005), language and cultural differences can result in miscommunication, improper treatments and misdiagnosis. Moreover, it is imperative for the caregiver to understand the elements of non verbal communication such as eye contact norms, and voice tone. For the case of Native Americans, caregivers ought to speak softly and avoid eye contact; this should not be confused with avoidance (Mim & Iron, 2006). In addition, many Native Americans are reluctant to express pain; consequently, it is imperative for the healthcare professionals to understand that the absence of complaints about pain does not necessarily imply that the patient is not experiencing pain (Campinha-Bacote, 2005). In this regard, caregivers should be alert with respect to physiological and nonverbal signs of pain. Caregivers should always seek for permission of the patient before touching any part of the body; this is because touching is considered extremely personal among Native Americans. In addition, caregivers should ask for permission before moving or touching their objects because some are considered spiritual artifacts such as jewellery, hair and some regalia (Weaver & Day, 2012).

With the already entrenched environment of political correctness (see stage 2), the local culture becomes a sort of “world” culture that can be declared tolerant and progressive as long as there is a lack of criticism against immigrants, multiculturalism, and their combined influence. All cultural identity will eventually be lost, and to be “American” or “British,” for example, will no longer have modern meaning from a sociological perspective. Native traditions will be eradicated and a cultural mixing will take place where citizens from one world nation will be nearly identical in behavior, thought, and consumer tastes to citizens of another. Once a collapse occurs, it cannot be reversed. The nation’s cultural heritage will be forever lost.

My culture identity, as I know it as is African American. My culture can be seen in food, literature, religion, language, the community, family structure, the individual, music, dance, art, and could be summed up as the symbolic level. Symbolic, because faith plays a major role in our daily lives through song, prayer, praise and worship. When I’m happy I rely on my faith, same as when I’m sad, for I know things will get better as they have before.

There are different disciplines within the humanities, but there is one that I feel that has influenced my cultural identity the most…music. I say music because from the start music told my culture’s history; informed others about deeds or events that had taken place, also, music was and continues to be important in comforting, healing, and during labor. “African American music has evolved through various eras and styles; the powerful melodic lines and the rhythm (the all-important rhythm) remained prominent and influential” (Powell, 2007, ).

One way that I’ve celebrated and tried to connect with what I know as my culture is to attend Juneteenth Festival of the Carolinas. “According to Welcome to Juneteenth, “this is an annual four day event celebrated in the month of June at Independence Park, in Charlotte, North Carolina, hosted by Pape Ndiaye, proprietor of the House of Africa located in Charlotte, NC since 1997” (Juneteenth, .). This family event unifies Africans, African-American, and non-African people and is celebrated with drummers, dancers, faith communities, local talent, special guests, and vendors that sell clothing, jewelry, food, books, art, music, furniture, purses, and much more. One may say we already have a day set aside to celebrate freedom. The Junete...


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Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina (.). Who Are The Lumbee? Retrieved March 7, 2014, from http:///?option=com_content&view=article&id=135&Itemid=115

Powell, A. (2007). The Music of African Americans and its Impact on the American Culture in the 1960’s and the 1970’s. Miller African Centered Academy, 1. Retrieved from http:///pti/curriculum/units/2007/

Main Section | Community Tool Box. (.). Retrieved March 4, 2014, from http:///en/table-of-contents/culture/cultural-competence/culture-and-diversity/main

Welcome to Juneteenth. (.). Retrieved March 7, 2014, from http:///

Whirty, R. (2007, March/April). The Lost Colony of Roanoke. Natives People. Retrieved from http://-/
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Cultural identity essay

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